MIchael and Hannah Webster Emerson

Michael Emerson
Born: about 1625
Died: after 1715

Hannah Webster
Born: about 1635
Died: after 1715

Married: April 1, 1657

FROM THE BOOK:

Elam Cheney, Aaron Cheney, Mehitabel Wells, Their Ancestors and Some Descendants by Marvel R. Cheney, 1967. Pages 6 - 30, 154 - 158, 170 - 174,(Mormon family History Library)

Michael Emerson was a man of decision and ability. He was elected constable in 1659 and one piece of his writing has come down in the files of Essex County, court. A warrant had been placed in his hands and he endorsed on the back the following memorandum in clear chirography: This attachment was served upon ye body of John Godfrey by me Michael Emerson constable of Haverhill April 16, 60.

Besides the work of the court a constable had to collect “rates” or taxes and keep close personal accounts with the town. Michael Emerson filed other positions of responsibility. He had learned the trade of “cordwainer” or shoemaker, which then included a knowledge and sill covering all materials and work that entered into the trade. So he was chosen “sealer of leather”, the officer who had authority to see that all sales of leather were made honestly, as to quality and quantity.

He was appointed to “join with Newbury men to lay out and state the way between them and us,” November 19, 1662. Was one of the surveyors of highways in 1695, his portion being that “between the Sar Mill river and the Great Plain.” At that town meeting he was elected one of the “tithing men,” appointed to keep order in the place of worship, pretty good evidence that he was a member of the church. The church records for the period of his residence in Haverhill have been lost, so that we cannot say with positiveness who were members, but this office is office enough to base strong presumption upon. He was once prosecuted for severely punishing his child, so sternly did he oppose what he believed to be wrong; all his children did credit to the family except Elizabeth, who again and again fell into disgrace.
Mr. and Mrs. Emerson, however enjoyed the respect of their neighbors, and were valuable helpers in promoting the advancement of the community in all good ways.


FROM THE BOOK: The Haverhill Emersons, by C.H. Pope, 1913

Introduction:

Two men of this surname, Michael and Robert Emerson or Emerson, whom we know to have been brothers, appeared in the town of Haverhill very early in its history; the imperfect records do not show when they arrived in this country or whether they had a residence in any other plantation before making their home in Haverhill. Thomas Emerson, or "Emberson" as he signed himself in the deed to his son John in 1648, was one of the very earliest settlers of Ipswich, close by (a town, in fact, from which many of the founders of Haverhill came); and it is not at all unlikely that Michael and Robert may have been related to Thomas and either come over with him or joined him afterward and spent some years in Ipswich. Michael married an Ipswich girl, Robert one from Rowley, near by; but neither of them left traces of residing at the place where he found a bride. The fact that all the pioneers of Massachusetts were from England except a very small number who were uniformly specified in the records of the time as from some other country, and the abundant evidences of English traits and characteristics, make it entirely certain that the Haverhill and the Ipswich Emersons were natives and recent residents of England.

Two books have been issued that treat of this subject: "The English Emersons," by Dr. Peter Henry Emerson, and "The Ipswich Emersons" by Prof. Benjamin Kendall Emerson and Capt. George A. Gordon—large, expensive works. The former presents vast numbers of abstracts of wills, records of Chancery proceedings, investigations after death into estates, etc., etc., and many brief sketches of families and individuals in various parts of Great Britain; shows many a coat of arms and other symbol; and also gives details of the ancestry and life of the writer who is a descendant of Thomas Emerson of Ipswich, born in Cuba, educated in and chiefly a resident of England. The conclusion of his researches is that Thomas Emerson of Ipswich was born at Bishop's Stortford in the county of Hertford, a little way from London, England, and spent some years there; and records of baptisms of children there, whose names are identical with Thomas' known children, are presented. Dr. Emerson failed to get cat pies of records at Bishop's Stortford for the years after the baptisms mentioned, or abstracts of wills or other documents which might show positively whether the persons concerned remained there, or whether Emersons of the parish that did remain mentioned the departure of some to America. This omission is serious, and the case is not absolutely settled until such investigation is made and reported. Dr. Emerson, however, was so far satisfied with the records found that he paid a large reward to Mr. Briggs who discovered them; and Prof. B. K. Emerson has adopted the solution of the problem offered by Dr. Emerson and gives it as a settled fact in "The Ipswich Emersons."

One matter is very definitely interesting to us in studying the origin of the Haverhill men of this name, namely, the claim made by Prof. B. K. Emerson that Robert Emerson of Haverhill was the eldest son of Thomas Emerson of Ipswich! This cannot be correct, for Thomas was in Ipswich as early as 1638, perhaps two or three years earlier; never referred in any way to Robert; had a son John old enough to receive a deed of land and enter into a business covenant to maintain his parents, in the year 1648; while Robert did not appear here till much later, so far as any record goes, and was married, apparently for the first time, in 1658; at no time does Robert give any token of having had wife or child before, nor allude to the Ipswich Emersons; and he is always mentioned second when his name and Michael's are coupled, indicating that he was the younger of the two. Michael, moreover, lived until the year 1715, thus giving reason for the belief that he was not born earlier than 1625, and Robert, by all tokens here, must have been born several years later.

The claim made in " The Ipswich Emersons " that Robert of Haverhill was the eldest son of Thomas and a native of Bishop's Stortford, was therefore a baseless and thoroughly improbable guess, which ought never to have been printed. While it may be yet discovered that Michael and Robert were natives of that parish and nearly related to Thomas of Ipswich, it is not right to assert as a fact what was only an assumption in the beginning and would have been seen to be impossible had a brief amount of investigation been given to Robert's record here.

The Bishop's Stortford family is well worth studying, in connection with the Haverhill Emersons, because its first positively known representative, Robert Emberson or Emerson, was a "Currier," a trade akin to that of Michael who was a shoemaker; the name Michael has not been found yet at Stortford by the searchers employed there; Michael and Robert might have been sons of Robert's son John. We present the following copies of what the two books give on this point, that our readers may see and judge for themselves.

1. " ROBERT EMERSON" married at Bishop's Stortford Nov. 24, 1578, Susan Crabb. She was buried Nov. 20, 1626, aged 70. He was buried Jan. 6, 1620-1. His will, dated NOV. 7, 1620, proved Jan. 23,1620-1, is headed, "I, Robert Emberson of Stortford in County Herts Currier, being aged and sickly"; to wife Susan lands in S. called Muggells Dale, containing about 12 acres, near a field called Woodfield, to hold for her life with remainder after her death to Thomas Emberson, my eldest son; I give her also the messuage wherein I now dwell for the term of fifty years; afterward the same to go to Margaret my daughter now the wife of Thomas Browne of Southwarke for 50 years; after her decease to James Browne her son for all the term of years then to come. The residue of my goods to the said Susan for her life, and after her death to my four children Thomas, John, Anne and Margaret. (Com. Ct. of London.)

Children, bapt. at Bishop's Stortford:

i. Alice, bapt. Nov. 22,1579.

ii. Margaret, bapt. Feb. 21,1581-2.

2. iii. Thomas, bapt. July 26, 1584.

iv. John, mentioned in father's will.

v. Anne, mentioned in father's will.

vi. Robert, bapt. Apr. 12, 1596; not ment. in fat's will.

2. THOMAS2 (Robert') married July 1, 1611, Elizabeth Brewster. Mentioned in parish records of Bishop's Stortford as a collector for the poor in the year 1636. This man is claimed as the Ipswich, Mass., pioneer.

Children recorded at S.:

i. Robert, bapt. May 24, 1612; m. at S. Oct. 22, 1635, Elizabeth Grave; had ch. Elizabeth, bapt. Dec. 3, 1637; was recorded at S. as giving 4d to the poor in 1642.

ii. Benjamin, bapt. Oct. 2, bun Oct. 27, 1614.

iii. Ralfe, bapt. Oct. 19, 1615; bun June 8, 1626.

iv. James, bapt. Feb. 16, 1617.

v. Joseph, bapt. June 25, 1620.

vi. Elizabeth, bapt. June 14, 1623.

vii. John, bapt. Feb. 26, 1625.

viii. Nathaniel, bapt. July 18, 1630.

ix. Susan, bapt. Mar. 17, 1632.

There is something very interesting if not convincing in the fact that the list of the Stortford Thomas' children contains the same name of the wife and six names of children the same as those known to be children of Thomas of Ipswich, namely Elizabeth, James, Joseph, John, Nathaniel and Susan, and that the dates of their baptisms correspond in general with those believed to be the birthdates of these Ipswich children. It is strange that we have no positive record here in New England of the ages of these persons, excepting Nathaniel, particularly as Joseph and John became ministers of some distinction; but neither Thomas nor either of those sons here (with the solitary exception of Nathaniel) left a statement of his age in any court testimony, as was often done in those days; so that there is no absolute test which may be applied to the comparison of the Stortford family with the Ipswich family. But the mention of four sons and two daughters, with the approximation to the ages commonly accepted here of the Ipswich family, certainly stands as very strong presumptive evidence that they are identical, and that the Massachusetts baker was the son of the Stortford currier.

But so far as the Haverhill Emersons are concerned there is nothing in these Stortford records that solves the problem of their origin. There are, however, many places in England where records show that the name Michael Emerson was common in that period, and often associated with both Robert and Thomas; and the spelling Emmerson and Emberson are frequent there; and some one of those places may have been the cradle of the Haverhill family. Sereby, in the county of Lincoln, was one of them; and the following will, given first by Mr. Henry F. Waters and afterward by Dr. Emerson, deserves to be followed out by any who investigate this problem.

Alexander Emerson of Sereby in the county of Lincoln, yeoman, made will 10 April, 1604, proved 10 February, 1605. Lands in Sereby, Howsam, Cadney and Glamford Brigges (all in Lincolnshire and not far easterly from Scrooby whence the Mayflower party came); bequests to wife, sons Michael, Robert, Thomas, James and John; deceased son George. (Pr. Ct. of Cant., Stafford, I;)r. Emerson has brought out in " The English Emersons " many wills of persons connected with this family, and none of them offers any evidence that members of the clan had come to America; but the ground has not yet been completely explored. There is a good field for research upon this problem.

Before the coming of Emersons to Massachusetts there had been some arriving in Virginia. William Emerson came over as a partner of John Davies in 1618 and was living at Jordan's Jorney February 16, 1623. Ellis Emerson with wife Ann and son Thomas, aged 11 years, came in " The George " in 1623, and was living at Martin's Hundred. Whether they left descendants or not is unknown to the writer.

John Emerson (the name abbreviated as " Jo: ") came to Boston in " The Abigail " in 1635; the only note in Hotten regarding him is his age,—" 20." He settled at Scituate and married a daughter of Rev. John Lothrop; then disappeared from our records. It has been asserted that he was called "baker" in Hotten's list of passengers; but this is incorrect.

A matter of considerable interest to some persons is the question whether the Massachusetts Emersons were entitled to bear a "coat of arms." We have seen that Thomas called himself "baker" in the deed wherein he conveyed property to his son John and made conditions to which he alluded in his will; so that the ignorant person who carved a coat of arms on the gravestone of Thomas' youngest son, Nathaniel, made a silly blunder. The Haverhill Emersons were also "yeomen," as Thomas and his family called themselves; so that no descendant of either of the Massachusetts Emerson families has the slightest reason for using any coat of arms as from Emerson ancestry.

It is the glory of New England that her founders were, with a very small number of exceptions, scions of the middle class, the real honor and strength of England, diligent workers in useful avocations, whose lives were filled with loving service for God and humanity. They cared more for helping hands than for empty "arms."

First Generation

1. MICHAEL EMERSON, born in England at a date not recorded here, but probably as early as 1625, is mentioned first in this country in any record yet found, on " the last day of the first month" (March) "1651," in a "Presentment," as a witness who might be called in a case reported by the Grand Jury of Essex County court. His residence is not mentioned. The next item is in the records of the town of Haverhill, March 3, 1655, when he received from the town one of the allotments of land that were made to inhabitants:

"Voted and granted that Michael Emerson shall have two cow commons and four acres of meadow to be laid out after the second division of meadow is all laid out."

These "cow commons" he was allowed to exchange for two ox commons in 1661. The grant shows that he was a resident of the town and had two cows at that date.

He was one of those who had a share in certain meadow lands which the town,gave out to inhabitants a little later.

"January 17, 1658. Michaell Emerson's third division of meadow being a quarter of an acre, shall be laid out together with his four acres of meadow which was formerly granted to him."

He also had a portion in the fourth division of meadow, February 28, 1661.

Meantime he and his brother Robert had made a purchase of a farm in the southwestern part of the town. The deed was dated January 6, 1662; the price was eighty-five pounds, and the condition that they should "pay for two acres and a half of accommodations upon ye so land."

"Six score acres of third Division of Upland more or less North East from Merrie's Pond Bounded with a white Oak & a 13black Oak by ye' ad Pond & two white Oaks at ye north. Also three Pcells of Second Division of Meadow two Pcells of it Joining unto Merrie's Creek at ye' East End of Merrie's Creek Pond & one parcell upon y"' Swamp lying in John Chinarees Third Division of Upland—All which Pcells are bounded round with upland & ye' other Pcell of it lying upon a Runn which runes into Merrie's Creek Pond near to ye West End of my third Division of Upland and bounded round with Upland."

[Essex Deeds, 30, 85.]

After this transfer the town gave him a tract adjoining his farm and afterward permitted him to exchange some land:

"Laid out to Michaell Emerson Forty and four acres of upland adjoining to his other land which he had of Robert Swan, bounded with a white oak between Thomas Lillford and him and with a black oak at the pond. One acre of Meadow in that land that is laid out to Mr. Ward, bounded with upland." [Date not given in town record.]

"December 14, 1663. Michael Emerson and Robert Emerson shall have liberty to lay down twenty or thirty acres of land, which is part of that they bought of Robert Swan, on the south side, and to take up as much as they lay down on the south west side of said land; George Browne and Robert Swan are chosen & appointed for to exchange and lay out the land now granted to the two Emersons."

The very imperfect way in which lands were surveyed at that period resulted in many misunderstandings; not strangely the bonds of the Emerson farm were so poorly defined that question arose as to whether their line did not include some of the "common" land; and they were obliged to pay for some which was found so fenced in accidentally.

Michael Emerson was a man of decision and ability. He was elected constable in 16549 and one piece of his writing* has come down in the files of Essex County court. A warrant had been placed in his handstand he endorsed

* It is certain, therefore, that his making his "mark" to his will was caused by infirmity, not ignorance.

Besides the work of the court a constable had to collect "rates" or taxes and keep close personal accounts with the town. Michael Emerson filled other positions of responsibility. He had learned the trade of " cordwainer" or shoemaker, which then included a knowledge and skill covering all materials and work that entered into the trade. So he was chosen "sealer of leather," the officer who had authority to see that all sales of leather were made honestly, as to quality and quantity. He was appointed to " join with Newbury men to lay out and state the way between them and us" November 19, 1662. Was one of the surveyors of highways in 1695, his portion being that "between the Saw Mill river and the Great Plain." At that same town meeting he was elected one of the "tithing men," appointed to keep order in the place of worship,—pretty good evidence that he was a member of the church. The church records for the period of his residence in Haverhill have been lost, so that we cannot say with positiveness who were members, but this office is enough to base a strong presumption upon. He was once prosecuted for severely punishing his child, so sternly did he oppose what he believed to be wrong; all his children did credit to the family except Elizabeth, who again and again fell into disgrace. Mr. and Mrs. Emerson, however, enjoyed the respect of their neighbors, and were valuable helpers in promoting the advancement of the community in all good ways.

In addition to the lands which fell to him as a proprietor in the town's distributions, he bought lands of Robert Swan, George Corly, Peter Green and Thomas Davis. He gave to his oldest son, John, a tract of land in the conveyance of which we find a delightful piece of evidence of what has been presumed by more than one historian, but has never been openly proved in print before the present writing. We quote the essential portions of the deed.

Know all men by these presents that I Michael Emerson of ye town of Haverhill in Essex county in y. province of Massachusetts Bay in New England on ye Consideration of that naturall love which I doe bear to my son John Emerson of Newbury in y' same county doe freely give unto ye said John Emerson my son all my right title and interest in that land & meadow land which my brother Robert arid I bought of Robert Swanne lying by and ajoyning to a pond in Haverhill called Merry Creek Pond and three acres of meadow of that side of my Spicket meadow next to meadow now or formerly of John or Onisephory Marsh as also one third part of that meadow which I bought of Mathias Button in a meadow called Strong water meadow which land and meadow above said I vallue at Sixty pounds money & doe freely give ye same & every part and parcel thereof untie all singular ye priviledges thereof thereon or to all or any of them belonging or any wise appertaining, etc....

Witness my hand & seal this Eleventh Day of July in ye Eleventh yeare of His Majties Reign. (1713)

Michael Emerson

marke & seal

Witnessed by Nathaniel Ayer and Josiah Gage, who made oath in court to the same February ye 16 Day 1715-6. (Essex Deeds, 29, 86.)

Michael Emerson also conveyed lands to his son Jonathan—"two acres, most of it an apple orchard"— May 21, 1695; to sons Jonathan and Joshua, May 21, 1699, ten acres that he bought of Peter Green and Thomas Davis, and his Spicket meadow, eight acres, reserving to himself life use of his mansion house and four acres of the upland; then, June 3, 1715, "Michael Emmerson, cordwainer,~' his usual description, conveyed to "my grandson Michael Emerson, now about six years of age, son of my own son Joshua Emerson," 44 acres of land, adjoining land he had bought of Robert Swan, and some other lands;and he "personally appeared" before Justice Woodbridge and attested his signature November 24, 1715. This is the latest date at which we know of his activities; it would appear that he died soon after. He had been in active business life, as our records show, since 1651,—64 years, —and must have been upwards of eighty-five years of age when he bestowed this gift upon his namesake grandson.

Michael Emerson married April 1, 1657, Hannah, daughter of John and Mary (Satchwell) Webster. Her father was an early settler at Ipswich and a valuable citizen; after his death Mrs. Webster married second, John Emery. She had three brothers, Satchwells, who came to the same plantation and proved worthy men. Mrs. Hannah (Webster) Emerson had no holiday life; what with the cares of a large family, the waywardness of one child, another daughter's dreadful experiences, and the inevitable difficulties of pioneer life, she had heavy burdens; but she bore all well and left a name for worthy living. She survived her husband, but the time of her death is not known to us.

We present a verbatim copy of Michael Emerson's will; he did not write it, for his sight had failed so that he could not even see to write his name at its close, as we have good proof he had been able to do up to middle life; it was a day of very imperfect "helps to read," and many a man of that period whose writing is extant during his active years left a will signed with a mark because he could not see to pen his autograph. The date of the proving of the will is not endorsed on it nor do we find any other record of the fact; but from references to him as deceased a little later it may be properly inferred that it was taken into court (after Mr. Emerson's death) near the close of the year 1715.

THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF:

Michael Emerson of Haverhill in y. county of Essex in New England: calling To mind y. mortality of this Life: being of a perfect memory and of good Compas mentus understanding but Considering my Later End drawing near I do theirfore make this my last will and testament & bequest: my Body I Comit after Death unto ye Earth by a Desant burial & my Spirit to return to god who gave it. In trusting to a glorious Resarection at y' last day & an inheritanc among the saints in Light: Threw Jesus Christ: ouer alone Redeemer. And for those few things of this world which it bath Pleased God to bestow upon me I do will and bestowe and despos of as foloeath I will y' all my Just Debts be payed: and ye Rest of my Eastat I bequeath & give in mannor foloing: viz: unto my beloved wife Hannah Emerson I give the youse of the east end of my dweling house all the Dayes of her life that she shal Remain my widow. I all so give hir my best bed and all ye beding their unto belonging and two cows & a smal bras kitel and a belmetel skilet. this. I give to my wife besides aseutabel and comfortabel maintenanc sewtabel for my widow out of my Eastat acording to ye Quantity shear of to be found her by my two Excutors of this my will I Do allso give unto my Eldest son John Emerson all my waring aparell beside what I have all Redy given him by Dead & no more: and unto my Son Samuel Emerson I give the sum of twenty pownds: and all my lands & medows in haverhill which I have not before this day disposed of by Dead. I: give be tween my two yongest sons namely Jonathan & Joshua Emerson: in perticilur: I do give unto my son Joshua Emerson my Dewling house and two acres of land ajoyning their unto and my Duck medow. tines last mentioned hous land & medow I give unto my son Joshua Emerson in ye [ . . . ] land hear to fore unto Jonathan Emerson and all ye Rest & Remainer of my [ . . . ] whear I now Live and all my out lands and medows. I: give Equely between my two above so sons Jonathan Emerson & Joshua Emerson y' is to say firstly my homestead and also my farm land about forty fouer acres and my Spicet medow and allso my Strong water medow. I do hear by give and bequeath to & Equely betwen Jonathan & Joshua: and all my Commonages and all or alley other wrights or titels or Intrests in lands. or: medows to me belonging. I do give unto Them y' so Jonathan & Joshua I. give the above named land & medow To them and their heiars after them to be by them disposed of to their heiars as they shall think most fit and shal see caus to dispose it: I: allso will and order my sd two sons The Excuters of this my will Jointly & Equely to give in and pay unto their Mother or Carey in unto heir a good and sufficient quantity of provision & Things nescsery for heir suport & maintainenc booth Comforting & Conveniant for heir maintainan & for her to keep house with in ye End of ye house which I have willed to heir whear she shal live all y dayes of her widowwhed to be it.Equely given by Jonathan & Joshua my two Excutors: I: do all so will and order these my two sons Excutors to my will to pay out as Leageseys for this my Eastat which I have given _ them these several leageseys hear after menshoned unto & among my hear after named Children: viz: to John Emerson: my wearing apparil as above & unto Samuel Emerson the sum of twenty pounds as a hove and unto my Dafter Hannah Duston the sum of twenty pounds beside what they have alredy had allso unto my Dafter Abagail: now Smith the sum of sixten beside what they have had alredy given them: and unto my son in Law hew Mathews I do give the sum of forty shillings beside what I have formerly given him allso I: do give to hew Mathewses Children as foloeath to his son John Mathews and his dafter Johannah Mathews I give thirty shillings apice If: they be living & Come for it and to Mary Mathews my grandafter. I give the sum of fiveten pownds if she shal live unto the time of payment or be marled & have a Child: and I do constitute these my two sons Jonathan Emerson & Joshua Emerson to be the sole and Jont Excutors of This my Last will & Testiment To pay the legaseys hear in wiled and given in all Respects as it is hear seat downe and wiled but I do not bind & order my sons to pay these leagiseis in money but in good pay at money pric and I do give them Three years time after my Deceas for to fulfill and Compleat all ye Several bequethments that I have hear in Expresed and given unto my Children & Gran Children: in Confirmation of what is hear writen in this my Last will & testament I have hear unto set to my hand and seal this eightenth day of July in ye year one thousand seven hundred and nine in ye 8th year of her majs' Reign Queen Anne of great Britain

Signed & sealed in presents of these witneses Timothy Kezer Nathan N Simon his marke James Jorden

Michael Emerson

Marke & seal (seal)

The foregoing will shows that Hannah, wife of Michael Emerson, was living in July, 1709; we have no record of her death.

Children:

i. Hannah2, one of the most famous women of early New England, was b. at Haverhill Dec. 23, 1657; m. Dec 3, 1677, Thomas Duston. She was captured by the Indians in one of their attacks on the settlement, March 15, 1697, taken from her bed with her infant of 6 days, and compelled to march with her captors. Seeing her child dashed to death against a tree; worn with long marching and cruelties, after going with the Indians for two weeks she and Mrs. Neff and a boy, Samuel Lennerson, rose in the night, killed and scalped ten Indians and made their way home through intolerable hardships. She carried the scalps to Boston and was paid the regular bounty. Her deed was one of the chief means of checking the cruelties of the Indians, showing them that "weak women" would meet their atrocities in kind. She was at no other time in her life found lacking in the gentleness and peaceful character of woman; this deed was the product of maddening experience. Mr. Duston, who first tried unsuccessfully to induce Hannah to let him carry her to a place of safety when he saw the savages approaching, bent his energies to the saving of their nine children; and by keeping them running and firing back at the pursuing Indians, managed to get them all to a place of safety.

     Children:

1. Hannah Duston, b. Aug. 22, 1678; m. Daniel Cheney, of Newbury.

2. Elizabeth Duston, b. May 7, 1680; m. Dec. 27, 1698, Stephen Emerson.

3. Mary Duston, b. Nov. 4, 1681; d. Oct. 18, 1696.

4. Thomas Duston, b. Jan. 5, 1683.

5. Nathaniel Duston, b. May 16, 1685.

6. John Duston, b. Feb. 2, 1686-7; d. Jan. 28, 1689-90.

7. Sarah Duston, b. July 4, 1688.

8. Abigail Duston, b. Oct., 1690; m. Samuel Watts.

9. Jonathan Duston, b. Jan. 15, l691-2.

10. Timothy Duston, b. Sept. 14, l694.

11. Mehitabel Duston (twin with Timothy).

12. Martha Duston, b. March 9, 1696-7; slain by the Indians.

ii. John, b. July 30, 1659; d. Aug. 15, 1659.

iii. Mary, b. Oct. 5, 1660; m. at Newbury Aug. 28, 1683, Hugh Matthews.

Children:

1. A daughter, b. July 18, 1685.

2. Judith Matthews, b. April ult. 1689.

3. Hugh Matthews, b. May 15, 1691.

4. Mary Matthews, bapt. May 18, 1701.


3. iv.	John, b. March 18, 1661-2.
4. v.	Samuel, b. Feb. 2, 16634.
    vi. Elizabeth, b. Jan. 26, 1665. Let the "mantle of charity cover" her history.
    vii.	Abigail, b. Dec. 17, 1667; d. Dec. 31, 1667.
5. viii. Jonathan, b. Mar. 9, 1669-1670.

ix. Abigail, b. Nov. 20, 1671; m. Nov. 30, 1693, Samuel Smith of Newbury.

Children:

1. Hannah Smith, b. Aug. 17, 1694.

2. Samuel Smith, b. May 1, 1696.

3. Jonathan Smith, b. Aug. 22, 1698.

4. Abigail Smith, b. May 8, 1700.

5. Mehitabel Smith, b. Feb. 22, 1701-2.

6. Mary Smith, b. May 18, 1704.

7. Sarah Smith, bapt. June 2, 1706.

8. Nathaniel Smith, bapt. July 18, 1708.

9. Timothy Smith, bapt. June 10, 1711.

10. Susanna Smith, bapt. May 10, 1713.

x. Judith, b. July 2, 1673; d. Sept. 8, 1673.

xi. Joshua, b. Mar. 2, 1675-6; d. Mar. 26, 1676.

xii. Ruth, b. May 8, 1676; d. Aug. 28, 1677.

xiii. Judith, b. Nov. 7, 1677.

6. xiv. Joshua, b. Nov. 17, 1678.

xv. Susanna, b. Apr. 30, 1680; d. May 8, 1680.

2. ROBERT EMERSON, born in England probably about the year 1630; came to this country at a time not on record here, but before January 4, 1658, when he was married at Rowley, Massachusetts, to Ann (Anne), daughter of Thomas and Jane Grant. It is known that Thomas Grant came from England to this country before the year 1638, as a fellow passenger testified (Essex Probate Court, July 20, 1698). He died about 1643 and his widow had an allotment of land in Rowley; on the death of her son John Grant in 1700, Anne Emerson, as a sister of John, received a share of that land.



FROM THE BOOK:

McCall-Tidwell and Allied Families by: Ettie Tidwell McCall 1931

MICHAEL EMERSON OF MASSACHUSETTS

MICHAEL EMERSON1 from Sereby, County of Lincoln, England, born about 1625 is mentioned first in this country on March 31, 1651, in a "Presentment as a witness who might be called in a case reported by the Grand Jury of Essex County Court, Massachusetts." From the records of the town of Haverhill, Massachusetts, March 3, 1655, he received from the town an allotment of land. (His brother, Robert Emerson, was granted land at the same time; he married Anne Grant (dau. of Thomas and Jane Grant of Rowley, Massachusetts)).

Michael Emerson was Constable, 1659; chosen "sealer of leather", an officer who had authority to see that all sales of leather were made honestly as to quality and quantity. He was appointed from Haverhill "to join with the Newbury men to lay out and state the way between them and us." He was elected one of the "tithing men," appointed to keep order in the house of worship. He married on April 1, 1657, Hannah Webster (dau. of John and Mary (Shatswell) Webster). He died, 1715; his wife died later.

Children:

        +1. HANNAH mar. Thomas Dustin (see later). 
         2. JOHN (1659-1659). 
         3. MARY b. 1660, mar. Hugh Matthews. 
         4. JOHN b. Mar. 18, 1662, mar. (1) Judith Cheney; (2) Hannah 
               Pou. 
         5. SAMUEL b. Feb. 2, 1663, mar. Judith Davis. 
         6. ELIZABETH b. Jan. 6, 1665. 
         7. ABIGAIL (1667-1667). 
         8. JONATHAN b. Mar. 1669, mar. Hannah Day. 
         9. ABIGAIL b. Nov. 20, 1671, mar. Samuel Smith of Newbury. 
        10. JUDITH (1673-1673). 
        11. JOSHUA (1675-1676). 
        12. RUTH (1676-1677). 
        13. JUDITH b. 1677. 
        14. JOSHUA b. Nov. 17, 1678, mar. Mary Clark. 
        15. SUSANNAH b. April 30, 1680, died 1680. 

+HANNAH EMERSON2 (Michael1) born December 23, 1657, at Haverhill, Massachusetts, married Thomas Dustin on December 3, 1677. She was one of the most famous women of early New England, the heroine of the Haverhill massacre by the Indians in 1697. Her will was probated March 6, 1737; his will was written April, 1724, probated November 27, 1732. They had twelve children.

*A full sketch of the life of Hannah (Emerson) Dustin will be found in the records of the "Thomas Dustin Family". (From Genealogical Family History of Thomas Gamble, Jr. of Savannah, Georgia, and from the History of the Emerson Family by Charles Henry Pope.)



FROM THE BOOK: 

Chase History of Haverhill, Mass. Page 122.

Michael Emerson

Michael Emerson, born in England at this date not recorded here, but probably as early as 1625, is mentioned first in this country in any record yet found, on “the last day of the first month, 1651” in Presentment, as a witness who might be called in a case reported by the Grand Jury of Essex County court. His residence is not mentioned. The next item is in the records of the town of Haverhill, March 3, 1655, when received from the town one of the allotments of land that were made to inhabitants. Voted and granted that Michael Emerson shall have two cow commons and four acres of meadow to be laid out after the second division of meadow is all laid out.”
These “cow commons” he was allowed to exchange for two ox commons in 1661. The grant shows that he was a resident of the town and had two cows at that date.
He was one of these who had a share in certain meadowlands, which the town gave out to inhabitants a little later. “January 17, 1658, Michael Emerson’s third division of meadow being a quarter of an acre, shall be laid out together with his four acres of meadow which was formerly granted him.”
He also had a portion of the fourth division of meadowland, February 28, 1661.
Meantime he and his brother Robert had made a purchase of a farm in the southwestern part of the town. The deed was dated January 6, 1662; the price was eighty-five pounds, and the condition that they should “pay for two acres and a half of accommodations upon Ye said land.”
“Six score acres of third Division of Upland more of less Northeast from Merrie’s Pond bounded with a White Oak and a black oak by ye said Pond & two white oak at ye north. Also three parcels of second Division of Meadow end of Merrie’s Creek Pond & one parcel upon ye swamp lying in John Chinarees Third Division of Upland-All which parcels are bounded round with upland and Ye other Parcel of it laying upon Runn which runs into Merrie’s Creek Pond near to ye West end of my third Division of upon and bounded round with upland.” Essex Dees, 30.35.
After this transfer, the town gave him a tract adjoining his farm and afterward permitted him to exchange some land: “Laid out to Michael Emerson Forty and four acres of upland adjoining to his other land which he had of Robert Swan, bounded with a white oak between Thomas Lillford and him and with a black oak at the pond. One acre of Meadow in that land that is laid out to Mr., Ward, bounded with upland.” (Date not given in town record) 
December 14, 1663: “Michael Emerson and Robert Emerson shall have liberty to lay down twenty or thirty acres of land, which is part of that they bought of Robert Swan on the south side, and to take up as much as they lay down on the southwest side of said land. George Browne and Robert Swan are chosen and appointed for the exchange and lay out the land now granted to the Emersons.”

The very imperfect way in which lands were surveyed at that period resulted in many misunderstandings; not strangely the bonds of the Emerson farm were so poorly defined that questions arose as to whether their line did not include some of the “common” land; and they were obliged to pay for some which was found so fenced in accidently.



FROM THE BOOK:

Ancestry and Genealogy of Thomas Grover. by Joel P. Grover 1959

Michael Emerson, b. abt 1625, England; came to America abt 1650, and settled in Haverhill, 
Mass., early in 1657. He M. - 1 April 1657, at Haverhill, Mass., Hannah Webster, (b. abt 
1635, nr. Newberry, Mass.; d- after 1709, at Haverhill, Mass.; da. of John and Mary
 (Satchwell) Webster, of Newberry). 

Michael was a 'cordwainer', or shoemaker, and lived his days out, at Haverhill. His first child, Hannah, married Thomas Duston, and was the heroic woman of the "Dustin Massacre" at Haverhill, 15 March 1697, being taken prisoner by the Indians and dragged off towards Canada, then making her escape just 45 days later, coming back to the frontier settlements with ten Indian scalps as proof of the deed, and collected bounty moneys for these scalps. (-ref. - "History of Haverhill, Mass.")

   Hannah, b. 23 Dec. 1657, Haverhill, Mass.; 


FROM THE BOOK:

 "The Emersons of Haverhill"

Michael EMERSON, (son of Thomas, son of Alexander, son of George, son of
John) was baptised 19-APR-1627 in Cadney parish, Lincolnshire, England
and came to America on or before March 1, 1651 (when he was named as a
possible witness to the Grand Jury of Essex County court.) 

The following is quoted from Jane Emerson James, The Haverhill Emersons: Revised and Extended, (Jane Emerson James, Lake Winnebago, MO, 1983), p. 10, 11:

"Michael Emerson...came to America on or before March 1, 1651 when he was named as a possible witness to the Grand Jury of Essex County court. His place of residence is not mentioned then but on 3 Mar 1655 he received from Haverhill one of the allotments of land which were made to inhabitants in the form of two cow commons and four acres of meadow "to be laid out after the second division of meadow is all laid out." On 17 Jan 1658 in the third division of meadow he was given a quarter acre to add to his four acres already given. On 28 Feb 1661 he had 6 portion in the fourth division of meadow. Also in 1661 he exchanged his two cow commons for two ox commons with the grant showing that he owned two cows at that date. 

On 6 Jan 1662 he purchased with his brother Robert a farm of six acres in the southwestern part of the town. The price was eighty five pounds and the deed had the condition that they should "pay for two acres and a half of accomodations upon ye sd land." Afterward at an unknown date the town gave him a tract adjoining his farm and on 14 Dec 1663 permitted him to exchange some land. Transcripts of these documents follow: Laid out to Michael Emerson Forty and four acres of upland adjoining to his other land which he had of Robert Swan, bounded with a white oak between Thomas Lillford and him and with a black oak at the pond. One acre of Meadow in that land is laid out to Mr. Ward, bounded with upland...Michael Emerson was a man of decision and ability. He was elected constable in 1659 and a sample of his handwriting has been preserved in the files of the Essex County court in which he endorsed the back of a warrant...Besides the work of the court a constable had to collect "rates" or taxes and keep close personal accounts with the town. Michael Emerson filled other positions of responsibility. He had learned the trade of "cordwainer" or shoe- maker, which then included a knowledge and skill covering all materials and work entered into the trade. Thus he was chosen "sealer of leather", the officer who had authority to see that all sales of leather were made honestly as to quality and quantity. He was the first to hold this office and was elected to it every year from 1675 until 1702. In 1677 he was appointed a helper, Andrew Greeley, after he "complained." He was appointed to join with Newbury men to "lay out and state the way between us" 19 Nov 1662 and was the surveyor of highways in 1695, his portion being between the Saw Mill river and the Great Plain." At the same town meeting he was elected "one of the tithing men", appointed to keep order in the place of worship--very good evidence that he was a church member.

Two shadows are cast over the good name of Michael Emerson in the copious records kept. In his 88 years he was seemingly disliked by a neighbor named White and he was once fined for mistreating one of his 15 children. In his History of Haverhill Chase quoted the town record thus: "This year 1666 Michael Emerson moved into town and settled near the White-house-on Mill Street. The grantees offered that if he would 'go back to the woods' they would give him a tract of land. He accepted the offer, and settled not far from the corner of Primrose and Winter streets. The 'Emerson Estate' on the south side of the latter street is part of the original tract of Michael Emerson." And in his Haverhill (an unpublished manuscript held in the Haverhill, Mass. Library) Chase quotes from the 1674 Records of the County Court, "Michael Emerson was fined 5s for his cruel and excessive beating of his daughter with a flayle swingel and kicking of her." He was under bonds in Hampton Court 16 May 1676 and it was abated in Nov 1676. Chase says that the daughter was Elizabeth who would have been 9 years old at the time. 

FROM THE BOOK:

Old Families of Salisbury and Amesbury Massachusetts vol 3, by David W. Hoyt, 1897

Emerson Family.

Mr. P. H. Emerson spent three years in searching the records of all the counties of England, to find Emerson families. The results he published in "The English Emersons," London, 1898, 168 + cxxxv pages. From these records it appears that THOMAS EMERSON, son of Robert and Susan (Crabbe) Emerson, bp. 1584, came to Ipswich in 1638, from Bishop's Stortford, Co. Herts.(*) His wife was Elizabeth Brewster, married in 1611. ["The English Emersons," pp. 153-9.]

MICHAEL and ROBERT EMERSON appeared in Essex Co., Mass., about the middle of the 17th century. They married daughters of the early settlers and became the ancestors of the Haverhill Emersons. The name Emerson was found in most of the counties of England. The names Michael, Robert, and Thomas Emerson were common in the county of Lincoln, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and the name Michael was seldom found elsewhere.

A study of the abstracts from original records printed in "The English Emersons," and the pedigree inserted opposite p. 61, shows, notwithstanding the opinion expressed on p. 157, that the Ipswich and the Haverhill families came from different counties in England, the former from Herts, the latter from Lincoln. The records found in various parts of the book yield the following, after eliminating some obvious errors. The baptisms and marriages are from p. cxv.

THOMAS EMERSON, of "Cadney and Howsam," Co. Lincoln, England, m. Aug. 10, 1612, MARGARET FROE. He was the son of ALEXANDER and JANET (Hornsey) EMERSON, of Serby [will of Alexander proved 1605-6,(+) p. xiii; also Hist. Gen. Reg. vol. 50, p. 527; that of Janet proved 1612, p. xxx]. Thomas was the grandson of GEORGE EMERSON, of Serby [will proved 1574, p. xxx]. All the above belong to the numerous family of Lincoln Emersons, in which names are often repeated.

The will of Thomas "of Howsham, in the parish of Cadney," "yeoman," dated May 20, 1656, proved Sept. 29, 1661[p. xxx], gave only ś5 each to Michael and Robert, but ś20 cach to Edward and Thomas, while John, the eldest son, was made sole executor. The name of "Daur. Elizth. Lilforth" is mentioned in the notes between the names of "Son Michaell" and "Son Robert Emerson"; but no mention is there made of the fact that all three were in America at that time. The wills of the three elder sons [John,
(*) It was formerly supposed that Thomas Emerson, of Ipswich, came from Sedgefield parish,
Co. Durham, Eng., but the above is now thought to be "more accurate."

(+)
This will shows that the Haverhill settlers had unclea in England named Michael, Robert,
John, and George, Emerson.

Edward, and Thomas] appear on the English records; but, of course, no probate is found in England for Michael and Robert. Elizabeth, Michael, and Robert, though mentioned in the will of their father Thomas, do not appear in the three wills of their brothers.

   Children: 
   I ALEXANDER, bp. Oct. 1, 1613; d. Oct. 19, 1613. 
  II ANNA, bp. Oct. 2, 1614; m. 1641-2 (RICHARD?) WRIGHT. in Cadney. The 
       will mentioned "grandchild" Ann Wright. 
 III ELIZABETH, bp. Apr. 12, 1616; m. before 1648[Hv], THOMAS LIN??URTR.  + 
  IV JOHN, bp. Mch. 20, 1617. Residence "Howsham in the parish of Cadney." 
       Will, "yeoman," Jan., 1691; Apr., 1692 [p. xxxi], mentioned 
       children of his bros. Edward and Thomas, but none of his own. As 
       he left no son, the family estate went to John, son of Edward. 
   V ISABELL, bp. Jan. 11, 1619; m. (???) GRANTHAM. Her father's will mentioned 
       her, in 1656; also "daur. Elizth. Grantham." in the printed notes, 
       which should probably be granddaughter. 
  VI SUSAN, bp. May 25, 1621; d. Feb., 1641. in Cadney. 
 VII EDWARD, bp. 1624; m. SARAH (???): residence Howsham in the parish of 
       Cadney; will, "husbandman," Mch., 16??4; May. 1685 [p. xxxi]. mentioned 
       sons "Nich." or "Mich."'. dec'd, and John'. son-in-law Thomas 
       Manier, and niece Ann Wright. 
VIII THOMAS, bp. Apr. 14, 1626; m. ANN (???): residence Brandicar in the 
       parish of Cadney: will, "grasman," Nov., 1681; Apr., 1682 [p. xxxi], 
       mentioned son Edward, dau. Ann Emerson. The will of John mentioned, 
       also, John Emerson. "son of my bro. Thomas." 
  IX MICHAEL,?? bp. 1627; m. Apr. 1, 1657, HANNAH' WERSTER.  + 
   X ROBERT, bp. Nov. 8, 1629; m. Jan. 4, 1658, Anne' Grant.  + 

1 MICHAEL1 EMERSON (Thomas), of Rowley and Haverhill, "cordwinder"; bp. 1627, in Cadney, Co. Lincoln, England; m. Apr. 1, 1657[Hv], (17) HANNAH2 WEBSTER. "Mihill" Emerson was a witness in the Ipswich Quarterly Court in a Rowley case, Sept., 1651. His name, spelled both "Myghill" and "Michael," appears again in that court in July, 1657.(*) He received land in Hv. in the "fourth division," Feb., 1661; and his name appears in the Old Norfolk Co. deeds as owning land in Hv. in 1659 and 1667, buying and selling real estate, 1672-3 and later. In 1675 he was chosen "to view and seal all leather," probably the first one to hold that office in that town; and he continued to hold it till 1702. Will, July 18, 1709; not proved; ment. wife Hannah. Both were living in 1715, when he was 88 y. old; but he was dead in 1719.(+)

Children: 
3     I HANNAH2, b. Dec. 23, 1657[Hv]; m. Dec. 3, 1677[Hv], THOMAS2 DUSTON 
          (Thomas1). She was the heroine of the Indian massacre in 1696-7 
          [E??. Inst. Hist. Coll. vol. 46, p. 350]. 
4    II JOHN2, b. July 30, d. Aug. 15, 1659[Hv]. 
5   III MARY?? b. Oct. 5, 1660[Hv]; m. Aug. 28, 1683[Nb], HUGH MATHEWS, 
          of Nb. He was dead in 1730, but wid. Mary was living in 1734, 
          when she declined to administer his estate, because she was too aged 
          to go to Ipswich, and there was nothing to administer. She was 
          not mentioned in the will of her father, 1709, which did mention "son-in-law 
          Matthews" and his children: John, Joanna, and Mary. Chil., 
          all but Mary from the Nb. records: A dau., d. Aug. 22, 1684; a dau., 
          b. July 18, d. Aug. 2, 1685; John, b. Feb. 26, 1687-8; Judith, b. Apr., 
          1689; Joana, b. Apr. 19, 1690; Hugh, b. May 15, 1691, prob. d. 
          young: Mary, b. (???); Hugh, b. May 19, 1696. Judith and the 
          second Hugh may have been dead in 1709. 
6    IV JOHN2, b. Mch. 18, 1661-2[Hv]; m. 1st, Judith Cheney; 2d, Nov. 2, 
          1710, Hannah Poor; res. Nb.; d. Mch. 6, 1745[Nb]??; 7 chil. 
7     V SAMUEL??, b. Feb. 2, 1663-4[Hv]; m. Dec. 14, 1687, (31) JUDITH3 DAVIS; 
          res. Hv. and Dover. She was a captive among the Indians 5 yrs. 
          between 1693 and '99. 7 chil., one of whom, Hannah3, m. JOB4 
          CLEMENT (12 Job??, of Dover?). 
8    VI ELIZABETH2, b. Jan. 26, 1665[Hv], probably 1665-6. She was never 
          married, but had children. [Chase's Hv. pp. 122, 145.] 
9   VII ABIGAIL2, b. Dec. 17, d. Dec. 31, 1667[Hv]. 

10 VIII JONATHAN2, b. Mch. 9, 1669-70[Hv]; m. June 15, 1699, Hannah Day; 
          res. Hv. 12 chil. 
11   IX ABIGAIL2, b. Nov. 20, 1671[Hv]; m. Nov. 30, 1693[Hv], Samuel Smith. 
          Births of several chil. on Hv. records. 
12    X JUDITH2, b. July 2, d. Sept. 8, 1673[Hv]. 
13   XI JUDITH2, b. Sept. 29, 1674[Hv]; d. Nov. 7, 1677[Hv]. 
14  XII JOSHUA2, b. Mch. 2, d. Mch. 26, 1676[Hv]. 
15 XIII RUTH2, b. May 8, d. Aug. 28, 1677[Hv]. 
16  XIV JOSHUA2, b. Nov. 17, 1678[Hv]; m. July 2, 1706[Hv], Mary Clark; res. 
          Hv. and Mth. 10 chil. 
17   XV SUSANNA2, b. Apr. 30, d. May 8, 1680[Hv]. 

2 ROBERT1 EMERSON (Thomas), of Rowley and Haverhill, bp. Nov. 8, 1629, in Cadney, Co. Lincoln, England; m. Jan. 4, 1658[Rw], ANN2 GRANT (Thomas1 and Jane), of Rowley. He was of Rowley as early as 1655[Sv], but soon removed to Haverhill, where he built a house between 1660 and Jan., 1675; freeman 1668; took the oath of fidelity in 1671[Chase]. The land of Michael and Robert Emerson is mentioned in a boundary, Haverhill, 1673 and '74; and their deeds are somewhat frequent later. In one of them Michael called Robert his brother. They voted upon opposite sides in regard to the location of the meeting-house in 1683. He seems to have lived near "Fishing River" in 1684. He died June 25, 1694[Hv]; will May 3, July 23, 1694, in which he mentioned his wife and their 8 children. Wid. Anna was drowned July 28, 1718[Hv]; will Dec. 24, 1708; May 4, 1719, in which she mentioned the estate of John Grant, of Rowley, deceased, that fell to her; and of her children, only Elizabeth, Lydia, Joseph and Benjamin.

Children: 
18    I ELIZABETH2, b. May 29, 1660[Hv]; m. (???) Chamberlain; living in 1708. 
19   II THOMAS2, b. June 4, 1662[Hv]; m. May 26, 1686, Elizabeth Goardin. 
          Both killed by Indians, 1696-7; res. Hv. 5 chil. 
20  III SARAH2, b. Apr. 23, 1665[Hv]; m. Jan. 15, 1684[Hv], WILLIAM2 WHITTAKER 
          (Abraham1); d. Aug. 20, 1702[Hv]. 
21   IV LYDIA2, b. Aug. 11, 1667[Hv]; living in 1708; probably m. Nov. 16, 
          1688[Hv], John Marsh. 10 chil. on Hv. records, b. 1689-1710. 
22    V JOSEPH2, b. Feb. 26, 1669-70[Hv]; m. 1st, July 16, 1690, Martha Toothaker; 
          2d, Wid. Hannah Patten; res. Hv. 10 chil. 
23   VI EPHRAIM2, b. Aug. 25, 1672[Hv]; living in 1694; but not ment. in 1708. 
24  VII STEPHEN2, b. Dec. 17, 1674[Hv]; m. Dec. 27, 1698, ELIZABETH3 DUSTON 
          (Thomas2, Thomas1); res. Hv. 14 chil. 
25 VIII BENJAMIN2, b. Jan. 8, 1679[Hv]; m. Jan. 14, 1707-8, Wid. Sarah Philbrick; 
          res. Hv. 5 chil. 
The writer prepared a genealogy of the early generations of the Haverhil Emersons several years ago, before he was aware that Rev. Charles H. Pope was at work upon the same family. Mr. Pope's "Haverhill Emersons," 1913 106 pp., covers this ground so thoroughly and so accurately that later generations are omitted here. The portion pertaining to the English Emersons is given entire, as originally written.(*)

 




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